Ghost Train

Railway Winery produces and offers this wispily mysterious white wine named for the “Ghost Train” story that is integral to the plot of the first novel in my series, The Water Cure.

I quote the article from Railroad Magazine verbatim in my book. I used to enjoy reading it to my passengers on the Eureka Springs & North Arkansas Railway while I served as conductor there.

You can also read it in James A. Fair’s The North Arkansas Line and Clifton E. Hull’s Shortline Railroads of Arkansas. (Okay, mine is cheaper.)

Ghost Train Vignoles, produced and bottled by Railway Winery

A short version of the story is printed on the label of the bottle. It reads:

“In 1911, the crew of a train approaching Gaskins’ Switch to take on water sighted a train ahead on the same track, stopped with signal lights burning. They were preparing to jump when it disappeared and could not be convinced to continue on their route until the morning brought assurances the tracks were clear. Thus, the legend of the Ghost train was born. If this wine feels the chill of the ghost, a phantom shall arise to haunt you. Beware of the cold touch of the Ghost Train.”

Label of the Ghost Train wine bottle

The wine is bottled, of course, in blue. Because if you see a tree decorated with cobalt blue bottles, they’re there to repel the “haints” (ghosts)!

About W. Keith Brenton

W. Keith Brenton is a retired communication specialist, minister and passenger train conductor, living and writing in the historic resort village Eureka Springs, Arkansas. He is the widowed adoptive dad of Matt and Laura, and Pop-Pop to one grandchild. He enjoys drinking the local water, but unfortunately doesn’t look any younger than his actual age.
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